Posts tagged #music for my video

"Say Hello" to Feeling Good with David Grumel's Latest Single

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French composer and multi-instrumentalist, David Grumel dabbles in everything from epic orchestral music to playful pop. With the release of his latest single, “Say Hello” his work offers listeners an uplifting escape, a lighthearted and reflective song that transcribes how a silver lining would feel like.

Read on to learn more about Grumel’s music compositions and his experience with making music for commercial use.


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Marmoset: Can you paint us a picture of how you began making music?

Grumel: I have a fairly unusual musical background, having studied classical piano, then very early on amplified music with a first gourd instrument at 11 years old. I recorded my first song at 14 and then did a short course in sound engineering. After that I spent a lot of years with different groups, in studios and concerts, with not a lot of success. Then at 31 I signed my first record deal with Universal Music and French independent label Naïve, for my first solo album. From then on I started being able to live from making music. I set up a recording studio La Song Factory with my friend Jérémy Rassat and started making music for film, TV and commercials. 

M: How would you describe your musical style? 

Grumel: It’s an artisanal kind of bespoke pop music, in the broad sense of the word. I’m as comfortable also doing electro, classical, folk, jazz or minimalistic solo piano. That's what I like, the eclecticism. It's always hard to define what you do instinctively. I am always guided by the emotion I feel when creating, as long as its sincere. 

M: As a composer, it seems like you've worked on everything project under the sun — from film to TV shows to advertising campaigns. Can you offer a sneak peek into what your creative or technical process looks like?

Grumel: I’ve been lucky enough to work on a vast spectrum of projects, but I always treat every piece of music I make as a unique prototype — nothing is ever a given. 

In terms of process it’s pure chaos at first, that’s the beauty. I explore every road, testing, changing, moving parts around, it’s by no means an exact science! The most important thing is to keep the process instinctive  and non-technical. Staying true to my what I feel, nothing else. It's like putting pieces of a puzzle together, but without the instructions.

Then usually after a few hours a direction comes through, a color and a structure. From that moment on a clear idea of where I want to take a piece of music becomes apparent. I almost always work alone, so it’s that initial solitary process that gives birth to something universal that you can share with so many people that makes it so interesting.

"To compose is to remember music that has never been written." — R. Schumann

M: What's a project that you're particularly proud to have been involved in?

Grumel: I support an association by the name of 7th Continent since it’s beginning. It raises awareness and works on the growing problem of plastics in our oceans. I worked on the music for their film, which you can see here —

Learn more about 7th Continent here.







Grumel: Musically, I think my solo work is what I’m most proud of. But of course I’m proud of any piece I feel I’ve successfully finished, whether solo or in collaboration.

I just finished working on the production of the second album of a Tahitian artist called Vaiteani and I had such a great time. I get real joy out of helping the artist complete their vision and getting them to their happy place because you then see it so clearly in the end result, it's fantastic. It creates very intimate bonds. The loyalty and rapport I have built up with many artists, composers and collaborators over the years also makes me very proud.

And of course when someone listens to and loves your music, that makes you happy and proud. Often it's the last project I worked on that seems the most successful to me because it means I’m still growing as an artist and that’s always a good thing, so I guess it’s a mix of all that.

M: Your single, "Say Hello" comes out today. Can listeners expect more music like this from you?

Grumel: I’m really excited about “Say Hello”, it’s already received a very warm welcome from the music industry and my peers. I collaborated with my good friend Neeskens on this, his voice just seems to blend in so well to the musical landscapes I like to create.

You can check out another track we worked on together called Back Into the Light here. I’m always excited about sharing new music, it’s like revealing different parts of yourself every time. I always like to mix it up, keep myself and listeners on their toes, so I can’t say for sure if there’ll be more songs like this, it’s really an organic process for me each time which starts with a feeling. Although I suppose there is always a trademark sound in there somewhere, something that defines you sonically as an artist.

M: As someone who crosses over between all different kinds of projects, what's something you'd pass along to other aspiring artists looking to break into composing for film, TV and commercials? 

Grumel: The only advice I could give is true for any aspiring musician: stay true to yourself and your artistic integrity in order to preserve who you are as an artist and your unique sound. Develop and nurture your craft obsessively, be passionate, be generous, have an opinion and be curious, fail a lot, never give up and good things will come… maybe!


Grumel’s single, “Say Hello” and more of his work is available for music licensing and commercial use on our roster here.

Uncovering the Podcast License Pt II

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Our clients come from all walks of life—and industries—yet they all share a common mission: too find music that serves their content’s purpose.

We’ve spotlighted everyone from independent filmmakers whose work has premiered at Sundance to Tribeca and dug into the stories of music video directors and producers. But what about the non-visual creative projects that also make the world go ‘round?

Kicking off our Uncovering the Podcast License series last week, we looked at the number of ways music and sound can serve a podcast’s narrative and theme—how licensing the right music can intrigue listeners to tune into future episodes, while creating a signature experience for the show’s overall brand.

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Audio producer and podcaster, Megan Tan knows a thing or two about licensing music for her esteemed podcast, Millennial—a notable series on growing up and finding a place in the “real world.” While Tan wrapped up the series a couple years back, the show has been recognized by publications like The Atlantic, The Huffington Post and A.V. Club, it remains to be a relatable series that can be applied to today.

Now living in New York City, Tan is still a producer, working on Gimlet Media’s The Habitat, NPR’s Planet Money and on a Pineapple Street Media podcast. Through her podcast and productions, Tan has utilized music and sound design to cultivate an immersive environment strictly through audio.

We sat down with Tan to look back on her arrival in podcasting (when it was still new and expansive territory) and her experience in making the hit podcast, Millennial:


Marmoset: Could you give us a look into what it was like before you made your first podcast

Megan Tan: Basically I wanted to be a radio producer and I had an internship at NYC Radio Lab for a semester but I didn't actually make radio, I didn’t know how to make radio. And my background is in photo journalism—and in photo journalism, what you do is, you go out and you shoot, right?

You Take photos and you create a portfolio and then people can see your work and then they can hire you. So I guess I just took that idea and decided to apply it to this new industry and Millennial started out almost like a portfolio piece; because the closest thing that I had was my life. I just wanted to practice collecting audio, interviewing people, writing scripts, mixing, making episodes and making radio stories.

M: What did it look like leading up the Millennial gaining more momentum and attention?

Tan: The whole idea was that all the work that I was doing would be a portfolio to get me a job in public radio—which is dead. I ended up getting a job at New Hampshire public radio. There I was continuing to make Millennial, I had like almost two full-time jobs. I was making this podcast and then I was working full-time at a public radio station.

And then at one point the podcast started getting more praise and press than the shows at the public radio station. And I just kind of decided to make this leap and dedicate myself to doing it full-time.

M: Did you ever view making Millennial as a way of connecting with other people through your own experiences?

Tan: You know, that wasn’t the goal, because at the time—I don’t know how many podcasts there were, maybe 250,000—I mean, right now the market is really saturated, but even then you’re like ‘who’s going to listen to them?’ Right, so yeah and to be honest, because it was built from the ground up and a lot of the press was organic, I didn’t think anybody was going to listen.

Yeah, so when people were listening, I was like oh shit. A friend of mine just said to me last night, you know, sometimes the best dancers are the people who dance as if no one’s watching. I feel like that’s how Millennial was created. Where it was created in this way where I just spoke into a microphone like no one was listening.

M: Looking back, what did the evolution of Millennial look like from its creator’s standpoint?

Tan: It did evolve because it had to become more sustainable. That’s why there are multiple seasons, if you keep listening, we’re really trying to find our footing after we get past the first season. Instead of it just being a ‘Millennial, a podcast about maneuvering your twenties post-graduation captured in real time,’ it just becomes ‘Millennial, a podcast about coming of age.’

And so that is broader and the purpose was for it to encompass a lot of people’s stories. But the problem with that is, you know, once you give an audience a very specific character to care for—which was me— the less personal you become. It was also the identify that was changing in real-time, as well.

The purpose also changed. It was no longer a portfolio or a personal essay about growing up or a personal documentary. It also has to become a machine, had to be able to live off it full-time and pay people—it became a business. So the mission had to kind of change a little bit. 

M: What did the ‘making of’ such a successful podcast look like story-wise? How did you decide what content to focus on as a millennial yourself?
Tan: We had a bit of a formula but each episode was different, you know? Hopefully the entry was some sort of peg to my life. Whether it was long distance relationships or being Asian in a very white setting.

And then we would try to branch off, maybe do other people’s stories sometimes—it was still my story. And I would just collect tape all the time. Like if I was still making Millennial, I would say, ‘hey do you mind if I record our conversation?’

M: What’s an episode that stands out in your memory as one of your favorites?

Tan: I really enjoyed making “Brunchies,” which is the third episode, because it’s purely sound. I lavved myself when I was doing a shift one day, so I have sounds basically from an entire work day compressed to like two minutes of audio. It was just kind of fun to create that scene with all of that tape.

M: We know you’re busy plugging away in New York—what kind of projects do you have in the works right now?

Tan: Since wrapping up Millennial, I’ve helped produce Gimlet Media’s The Habitat, then there’s also Pineapple Street, they did Missing Richard Simmons; I helped them produce a couple of those shows. I helped them produce Going Through It with Ann Friedman of Call Your Girlfriend. And then also another show called The Unwinding of a Miracle and worked at NPR’s Planet Money. And just recently reported on a piece for NPR’s All Things Considered.


A big thanks to Megan Tan for taking us behind the scenes in making Millennial—it’s just one example of great podcasts utilizing music and sound to create an immersive audio experiences. Check out the full series here and more of her work here.

Music in Film: StudioFest Filmmakers Make Their First Feature

Souvenirs is StudioFest’s debut feature film that follows a murderabilia shop clerk who discovers her own family’s dark history when asked to sell souvenirs from a crime not yet solved.

Souvenirs is StudioFest’s debut feature film that follows a murderabilia shop clerk who discovers her own family’s dark history when asked to sell souvenirs from a crime not yet solved.

When Jess Jacklin and Charles Beale kicked off StudioFest last year, their mission was to redefine traditional film festival processes—to award the winning filmmakers not just with a temporary status or accolade, but with means of creating their first feature work.

“Independent short filmmakers and screenwriters desire one thing: to make their first feature,” says Beale. “We have aimed to align the skew, bringing talented filmmakers straight to their first feature. The project has grown to include so much talent and enthusiasm and we can’t wait to share the film.”

Winning director, Anna Mikami and winning screenwriter Matthew Sorvillo walked away from the festival experience with a newfound professional partnership. With Mikami in the director chair and Sorvillo spearheading the script, Souvenirs was the product of creative collaboration, perseverance and a tried-and-true indie kind of resourcefulness.

A still from StudioFest production, Souvenirs

A still from StudioFest production, Souvenirs

Produced under a 1M micro-budget, the StudioFest collaborative proved it’s possible to churn out a high quality production even when a big studio isn’t at the helm. Partnering up with Marmoset to equip the production with the music rights for their feature film, a dream soundtrack was no longer out of arm’s reach.

Proving it’s possible to find songs for commercial use on a budget is what Marmoset’s music licensing team does daily. But when partnering up with other community organizations like StudioFest—to help outside projects license music for video—it’s a commitment to our community; to give what we can from our side, while always ensuring our artists receive their share and exposure for their work.

Thanks to the pioneering film festival that’s examining the leaps and hurdles every filmmaker faces, Souvenirs is no longer an aspirational idea—it’s a film slated to premiere in Fall 2019.

“The winners we chose compliment each other in a way we are very excited about. As we get into our second week of filming, there’s an air of enthusiasm shared with everyone involved,” says Jacklin. “Although we’re working with a micro-budget, the caliber of talent from cast, crew and sponsors adds a tremendous amount of value and we couldn’t do it without their dedication and vision.”


Stay tuned as we cover the release of Souvenirs and the making of its soundtrack.

Using Music in Videos, an Interview with Filmmaker Jeremy Summer

Toro y Moi’s music video, “Ordinary Pleasure” — produced by Little Moving Pictures.

Little Moving Pictures creates and produces everything from commercial advertisement to film & TV. And everything they make sounds great too.

From the disco-inspired studio captured in the one million viewed music video they produced for Toro y Moi to the melancholic comedy about a young dad reeling from a broken marriage (How It’s Goin’ ) — Little Moving Pictures is taking off visually and musically. To find out more about what they’re up to and their approach for using music in videos, we caught up with studios’ co-founder Jeremy Summer.

Jeremy Summer and daughter California Summer on the set of  How It’s Goin’

Jeremy Summer and daughter California Summer on the set of How It’s Goin’

Marmoset: Hey Jeremy, can you tell us what drew you to produce How It's Goin'?

Summer: When people ask me why we make the music videos and short films we do at Little Moving Pictures, my simplest answer is that we do those things because we said we would.

Working at an agency, everyone always has these side hustle ideas but they rarely get executed—a pitch comes up or a big campaign or whatever—it’s hard to carve the time when you’re working for someone else, where as here we can come up with an idea and do it without asking anyone’s permission.

How It’s Goin’ actually started a few years ago on 4/20/2016—I asked one of our collaborators Noe Chavez to come to golden gate park on 4/20 and shoot some portraits—we made this thing and put it out the next day. I had an idea for setting a story inside of it, something we’d film guerrilla style with the built in production value of thousands of extras—my first idea was a catholic nun traveling from Europe who accidentally comes across the 4/20 gathering and has a transcendent experience.

But my friends 26 Aries (directors Irene Chin & Kurt Vincent) came back with the script for what eventually became How It’s Goin’ and had their friend Steve Talley (the lead actor) attached. It’s the first scripted narrative thing we’ve done—think of it as our student film. We just wanted to try to do something new and thought that the novelty of making a film inside an actual event could result in something unique.

M: At what point do you guys sit down to talk about music the films or videos you create?

Summer: Music is a big deal to us across all of our projects and over the years we’ve developed a lot of relationships both with music houses like Marmoset and with labels/licensing entities. Earlier cuts of How It’s Goin' had a lot of different things happening musically that are very different than the final cut.

On this one, it really all came together toward the end. We brought on our friend Anthony Ferraro to do the original score bits—he plays keys in Toro Y Moi, we had just done a music video together for their single “Ordinary Pleasure”—and he nailed it in three-four days between tours; we wanted some warm Fender Rhodes stuff that helped connect the scenes and carry the picture, we are so happy with what he did for us.

M: What are some of the bigger challenges for filmmakers when it comes to creating music for their film?

Summer: One of the biggest challenges was finding a great piece of authentic sounding reggae music. Our rough cut had a great dub track from Trojan Records and even though we have a connection to the folks that license for that label, our timeline and budget weren’t going to work.

We looked at some stock libraries and were extremely disappointed with the “reggae” options. We were so thrilled when looking through Marmoset’s roster to come across the Dwayne Ellis song—in addition to having the sound we were looking for, it also had lyrics that tied in nicely with what the character is going through in the film and it sounds authentically Jamaican/vintage which is what we were going for.

We were playing around with a bunch of ideas for the song that ends the film and runs over the credits and had been listening to a lot of SF bands—Girls, Kelley Stoltz and Sonny & The Sunsets and came across "Children of the Beehive” which has lyrics and a feeling that ties back to the film in such a special way it’s almost as though it was written into the script.

I think the music we ended up with is a huge part of the quality of the end product—without the score and especially the songs, I don’t think it would have gotten the attention that it’s getting (Vimeo Staff Pick!).

M: What's something that really sets Little Moving Pictures apart?

Summer: I think the volume and quality of stuff we’re doing outside of advertising is something that differentiates us — though of course we have lots of peers we admire who are doing something similar — and the kinds of teams we can spin up without having to have everyone on a “roster” or a contract.

We also have a focus on post-production that I think might be a bit unique even amongst full service production companies, the editor is essentially a creative director on our projects from the moment we get a brief, not just there when we edit.

Little Moving Pictures’ mascot, Beatrix

Little Moving Pictures’ mascot, Beatrix

Because we’re so small (three of us full-time) and our over head is so low as a result, we get to be selective about the projects we take on so most of the work we’re doing is stuff we’re genuinely happy to be doing whether its for brands or for fun—either the budget is there and we can treat our crews properly/pay promptly and put on a good show for our clients or the creative is something that we’re excited enough about that we can rally the troops and make it happen regardless of budget.

Our hope is that eventually the passion projects and branded content will start to intersect more- feature length documentaries for brands, music videos that are sponsored, that sort of thing.

Also, my dog Beatrix. No one else has a Beatrix.

M: Your studios create everything from music videos to ad campaigns — what's the type of creative project that you're always excited to dig into?

Summer: We’re so lucky to do a blend of work for brands and work for ourselves. Aside from paying the bills (thanks brands!), working on commercials and branded content has helped us develop relationships with the directors we collaborate with and also the crew community and folks who are instrumental post production partners—colorists, sound mixers, music houses etc.

We leverage those relationships when it comes time to do the music videos and short films— people are down to lend their craft for little to no money on those things because we keep them busy and treat them well when we’re working for brands. Doing the music videos and short films is almost a gift to ourselves. It becomes material we can use to market Little Moving Pictures but in a lot of ways, we do art simply for the sake of doing it—and to learn and grow from the experience.

We love making commercials (especially when the budgets/timelines are reasonable), but there’s nothing like getting all our friends together to make some art.


Read more on Little Moving Pictures and watch Vimeo Staff Pick short film, How It’s Goin’ by clicking here. Then head over here to check out more of their films.

Launching New Record Label, Infinite Companion

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Remember the era of making mixtapes or burning CDs for your pals? Yeah, we kind of miss those days too. The thrill of finding music you couldn’t wait to share, then compiling songs into perfect order.

The music itself was great, but sharing it was even better.

Because it wasn’t just about passing along a song, it was an invitation to dig into something with each other. It’s pretty much how we feel in announcing our new record label, Infinite Companion — an artist collective where unabashed individuality, diversity and damn good music live together under the same roof.  

We’ve already kicked things off by inviting Pure Bathing Culture, OMA and Frankie Simone to our label’s roster. We’ve even made a special mixtape featuring their music. Call us nostalgic, but we just wanted to share it with our friends.

Music Night Fundraiser at Marmoset

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A week focused on celebrating music and our community (check out the Portland Design Week event we hosted on Wednesday) can only properly be wrapped up with a good cause.

This Saturday April 13th, gather at Marmoset and join fellow education supporters for a memorable fundraiser; emphasis on fun. With proceeds going toward local education institute St. Andrew Nativity School, attendees will get a front row seat music experience — the night featuring a live performance of pop sensation, Frankie Simone.

The evening also includes a live auction for one of a kind experiences and amazing food & drinks. Show your support and RSVP by following the link below. See you there!