Posts tagged #Filmmaker

Turn up the Volume on March’s New Music Mixtape

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On the hunt for new music? We’ve got you covered.

March’s mixtape has all the newly added music that’s now available for music licensing. From the psychedelic witchgaze vibes of Candace (think Fleetwood Mac meets Mazzy Star) to new Marmoset artist, I$$A (dishing out a fusion of Afropop and hiphop), there’s a taste for everyone. Start off with these five staff picks then dig into the rest.

If I Wanted To” by Cabri x Sub Q Taneous

Your Love's a Drug” by I$$A

Body Move” by Mofak

Midnight Blue” by Candace

Body Move” by Mofak

Dig into the rest of Marmoset’s new music mixtape below. Can’t find what you need? Get in touch with our music licensing experts, our Creative Services Team is here to help. Shoot us your questions here.

Womxn of Music: Fritzwa

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To the womxn of music, thank you.

Not just for paving the way for others to follow in your footsteps but for speaking your truth when the noise tried to drown you out, the times you kept showing up even when it was exhausting or felt thankless. Thank you for always relenting, speaking up, inventing and overcoming — for sharing your stories and not backing down. It matters and whether it felt like it in the moment, it was noticed.

March 8th is International Women’s Day and for the Marmoset community, it’s not just a day of recognizing and honoring the achievements and history made by women — we strive to do that the other 364 days out of the year.

Instead, it’s about reflecting on each other’s journeys, lifting one another up while looking ahead; because staying sharp and strategic is the only way to stay ahead of the game. And while an internationally celebrated day of recognization is nice… we decided to share the microphone with five amazing artists we work alongside and whose music we feature on our roster. Because we’re not just fans of their music, we’re admirers of their mentalities, their spirited hustle and won’t back down attitudes.


Still from “Sitting Pretty” music video featuring Fritzwa — directed by Fritzwa & Ikaika Cofer

Still from “Sitting Pretty” music video featuring Fritzwa — directed by Fritzwa & Ikaika Cofer

New York City native, Fritzwa gave us the lowdown on her new music and the momentum that gets her up in the morning.

After changing up her creative environment by leaving New York for Portland, Oregon, Fritzwa now hustles back and forth between lush Pacific Northwest and bustling Los Angeles, California. This year she’s taking the west coast by storm, taking on musical collaborations between cities. And there’s no question of the determined spirit that fuels the artist, she’s continually setting out to conquer, pushing back in the face of opposition.

“I just have this relentless attitude about everything,” says Fritzwa. “Just in terms of being marginalized, you have to have that kind off mentality that you’re not going to take no for an answer. I don’t allow anybody to tell me no, if there’s something I want to make or if someone’s preventing me from getting to someone else, it’s just fuel for me to accomplish those things even more.”

And with being in the position of trading a high-level marketing job with Nike to produce music full-time, Fritzwa uses this chapter in her life as a motivator for growth. Creating music is a livelihood for her — she’s a businesswoman just as much as she is a musician.

Physical backdrops aside, Fritzwa is an artist who embodies constant evolution and change, her work ethic an example that even those outside the music industry can draw motivation from: here’s a woman on the move, eager to learn, grow and challenge herself even if it pushes her to the limits.

And in the common scenario of women (especially those of color) being singled out or underrepresented in positions of authority, it can be easy to succumb to a certain of complacency — to simple accept rather exert more energy in pushing back. But for Fritzwa, it’s about putting in the work and time now and going the distance.

“Just because things aren’t happening for you on your timeline doesn’t mean they’re not supposed to happen,” says Fritzwa. “It just means that maybe you’re not ready for what you want. I’ve been frustrated about a lot of things when it comes to music and looking back, if what I wanted had happened to me, then it would have been very short lived.”

Currently producing new work in Los Angeles, Fritzwa is exploring Afrobeats with her newly released music — her past two songs a fusion of West African stylings and pulsing electronic elements. “Shake Waist” is a sample of the latest direction she’s been heading musically.

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And while just a sample of her recent projects, Fritzwa is gearing up to dish out a variety of singles this year; the work will encapsulate her initiative toward exploration, a meld of collaboration with different producers and crossover of genres. It’s a year of beginnings and active diligence — most importantly, it’s crucial to note they’re products of her skilled talent and determined spirit. She’s making it happen.

“You have to set your sights beyond anything you could ever achieve,” says Fritzwa. “Because if you do that, then you know you’re always going to grow toward that, you’re always going to learn and going to be humble. And I think that the music gods will look favorably upon you because you’re looking at it as a craft as opposed to a means to an end.”


* We recognize women of all origins, backgrounds and identities.

The Ultimate Music Glossary

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Navigating music licensing terms and definitions is a breeze when you have the ultimate music glossary on hand — so we created one just for you.


License

Licensing from the Marmoset catalog of music entails obtaining rights to use the song(s) for an agreed upon time period. Music licensing gives you the ability to use a song in almost any kind of creative project — like building out a stellar soundtrack for your feature film or creating a signature sound to your podcast’s intro.

Custom License

Marmoset can tailor a license to your project’s specifications — does your creative project have some tricky variables or broadcasting terms, or are you considering using a specific kind of vintage song but not seeing the “Buy Song” button? A custom license best ensures you’re covered, fill out our custom license form to get started.

End Client

The end client is the person or company the content is made for — if you’re a videographer hired to film and edit an ad campaign for Nike, the end client would be Nike. Swoosh!

Employee Count

This is is the number of employees who work for the project client’s company. For example, if you were creating a video for a large company like Amazon, the employee count is the number of employees employed by Amazon.

Internal Use

When music is licensed for content such as internal presentations, meetings, intranet or internal email blasts. If it's not being publicly shared or released, we consider this internal use.

Industrial Use

This refers to licensing music for media showcased in trade and sale shows, conventions, institutional meetings, retail dealers/in-store use, kiosks, PR use and B2B facing videos.

Instrumental

If a song is absent of lyrics (vocals), the song will be labeled as instrumental. Commonly, Marmoset has both instrumental and lyrical versions of a song — here’s an example of how an instrumental song is labeled on the search page.

Intellectual Property

Intellectual property covers intangible content and creations — it covers anything from trademarks to copyright. When you see intellectual property, this indicates that content belongs to that content creator. For example, a song, while not tangible, is still an artist’s intellectual property.

Lyrical

Lyrical indicates a song with lyrics (the inclusion of vocal melodies). Sometimes the lyrical versions of a song will contain lyrics. While browsing the roster, click the three vertical dots and select Lyrics to see more.

Monetization

Using on one’s content to generate revenue can be categorized as monetization. When it comes to music licensing, streaming sites or any platform that incorporates pre-roll ads is a monetary opportunity for the content creator.

Non-Permitted Content

This is content that goes beyond the limit of what the license terms cover. Using the previous example of a Personal - Single Use Podcast License — if the podcast is hosted on a commercial or website, this scenario would fall into non-permitted content. Not quite sure and need to double check? We can help.

Perpetual

A perpetual license means forever, ever. With perpetual licensing, you don’t have to worry about the hassles of renewing a license and its terms. An indefinite (perpetual) music license means you can keep your YouTube miniseries online without the song’s license expiring.

Performance Rights Organizations (PRO)

Performance Rights Organizations support artists and songwriters in getting paid for the usage of their work/music through royalties. While Marmoset focuses on helping our artist community get paid for their music, we are not a PRO but instead a sync licensing agency and original music production studio.

Permitted Content

When purchasing a license, you’ll want to review what exactly the license covers. For example, a Personal - Single Use Podcast License’s permitted content covers a single 12 month audio podcast series posted by a non-commercial place (i.e someone’s blog). Read up more on a license’s permitted content here.

PR Usage

Licensing music for promotional purposes or for your company’s PR campaign? This is right up your alley. We can help with licensing music specifically for PR use, just ask.

Renewal

In the case of licenses that are nearing their expiration date (non-perpetual licenses), once the license reaches its entire duration period you’ll have the option to either extend/renew said license.

Web (Paid)

When a song is being used in material where you’re generating revenue (think YouTube videos with sponsored or promotional ads, such as Hulu pre-roll or even social boosting) . Keep an eye out for this one especially if it falls within a license’s non-permitted content description.

Web (Unpaid)

Content with no ad dollars behind it or if being shared on a personal website. If your film was created outside an actual studio system and is being shared in a standard festival circuit, this is considered Unpaid Web. In the chance your film is picked up later for distribution, get in touch with us to revise your license conditions.


Monday’s New Music Mixtape

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While we can’t completely fix the downer vibes of Monday, this Monday mix of new music is sure to help launch your week in the right direction. From the release of Y La Bamba’s new album, Mujeres a vibrant work of Latin-pride and abrogating machoism to the new Fritzwa & J. Brodsky collaboration — their single The Best makes us nostalgically recall our fave throwback jams.

New music hitting the Marmoset catalog of music now — start with these five songs first:

Cruel 2 B Kind” by Mïrändä

Boss” by Jike Junyi

Mujeres” by Y La Bamba

The Best” by Fritzwa & J. Brodsky

Syntax” by Duncan Burnett

Dig into the rest of Marmoset’s new music mixtape below:

The Artists Behind Music Licensing

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Wesley Jensen hails from Denton, Texas. Like other musicians, he creates music to share across the internet and for live performances — it’s a way of life for many working musicians, to record, share, tour and repeat. Oftentimes it can feel like a labor of love, to invest so much of one’s musical craft, to be so committed to something with not a ton of fiscal reward (at least not right off the bat).

This kind of scenario isn’t uncommon for many musicians and it’s one of the reasons Marmoset sets out to improve the music game — focusing on supporting real, touring musical artists through music licensing. Whether it’s collaborating for original composition or placing our artists’ music on viral campaigns, we’re focused on strengthening our community through sustainability.

Every dollar you spend to license a song or invest in original music for your project goes toward a musician’s lifestyle, toward a working artist’s income — so they can focus more time on creating amazing music.

Looking at the journey of the Marmoset dollar, we sat down to chat with Wesley Jensen and learn more about how music licensing has impacted his musical career over the years.

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Marmoset: Can you tell us a little bit about your journey in music in general and how you came to Marmoset? 

Jensen: My interest in music started back in Jr High and it hasn’t ever stopped; I feel like I’ve been in some sort of band ever since. My first release under my own name came way back in 2007 and Marmoset reached out to me in 2011 about being part of the artist catalog. To be honest, I thought it was spam and ignored it for a bit. Ha! It took a strong pursuit by Ryan Wines to wear me down and he finally won me over after I played a Marmoset Music Fest NW Party. Meeting everyone and seeing how great they were, I knew I had to hop onboard. 

M: We’d also love to learn about some creative projects you're most proud of, how do you think they helped define your purpose and desire to pursue music?

Jenson: The music business can be really brutal, so it’s all about the small victories. Ha! Anytime I’ve noticed myself grow as a musician has been important for me. From my first show, to my first album release, to my first national tour, etc, it’s all encouraging and has helped me want to continue on.

As far as specific moments, I’d say around the time I met Marmoset was an exciting turning point for me. That year I had put out my first full length record in which I produced, engineered, and mixed all on my own (which was a lot bigger deal back then as compared to now). It turned out good and was nice to be validated by folks like Marmoset who took it and put it to commercials, etc. 

M: What did your introduction to music licensing look like? What do you think are some common misconceptions about the licensing game? 

Jenson: Licensing has been amazing for me, it’s opened a lot of possibilities musically. I always try to encourage people to to get involved with it if they have the opportunity. In fact, I think I’ve been a bit of an unofficial spokesperson for Marmoset over the years. Ha!

I think there are quite a few common misconceptions, the first being that it’s scary in any way. As musicians, we’re so protective of our craft that it’s hard to sign contracts and think that your music might be used for something weird. The reality is that there’s nothing to lose, especially if your involved with an agency like Marmoset, it’s only beneficial and full of rewarding possibilities. I’d say that the other misconception is that it’s easy — you make music and it gets licensed, just like that. Ha! It’s not true. There’s a lot of work involved in finding the perfect song for each project so it takes patience to see results. You never know when something’s going to land, but it feels like Christmas when it does. 

M: What was your reaction when you first saw your music licensed for a project? How did it compare to something like performing in front of a live audience?

Jenson: I think my first few big licensing hits were commercials. It was weird honestly, but it was cool. It felt good. It’s definitely fun to have family and friends reaching out saying they just heard your music on TV. It’s hard to compare live music to licensing, both are very rewarding I’d say, but different. Live music is very emotionally driven, lots of energy, very in the moment, etc. Licensing is more behind the scenes as opposed to being front of stage, but it’s cool to know you that something you created was picked out of a myriad of options. It’s always fun to win things. 

M: What something you would say to an artist new to the world of licensing or just starting out, is there anything helpful you wish you had known? 

Jenson: If they’re on the fence I’d tell them to go for it. I’d tell them it’s fun and rewarding and they’ve got nothing to lose. If they were on board I’d tell them not to worry about anything at all, the hard part (making the music) is over, now they get to sit back and relax and enjoy the fruits of their labor. Trust in the people they’re working with and let them find the right opportunities. And if they’re lucky enough to work with Marmoset I’d tell them to say “yes” to anything and everything they’re asked to be involved in. 

M: What new projects are you working on right now?

Jenson: I am ALWAYS working on new projects. I just finished up 2018 releasing a 4 part (16 Song) EP collection Something Old, Something New, Something Else, Something Blue, three of the four are produced by Marmoset’s Brian Hall. Currently, I’m back in the studio working on a brand new project that will wrap up later this spring. All good things!