Posts filed under Education

Marmoset presents Music Placement in Media

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For Portland Design Week, Marmoset opened its doors to the music and film community, delving into the world of music placement in media. An expert panel of music supervisors including Morgan Rhodes, Megan Barbour and Brooke Wentz, the discussion revolved around the epicenter of music supervision — from their favorite upcoming artists to common misconceptions about what their day to day looks like (no it’s not all just pitching one song then kicking back over beers with the film crew).

While getting music rights is imperative for any music supervisor working in the TV & film industry, the panel echoed a core music supervision responsibility they all share: it’s not merely about finding music that brings the visuals to life but searching for songs that punctuate the director’s overall message without interference.

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“My interest is always about serving the story,” says Morgan Rhodes, LA-based music supervisor. “I come from an indie film background, this is sort of how I got into the game; I don’t know what it took for that filmmaker to get to the point of having their film in festivals, so the last thing I want to do is throw my own agenda on it. Sometimes it’s a great song, but it might not be a great song for that moment. But if it is a great song while serving and carrying the moment, then that’s what I’m about.”

The topic of jumping through hoops of approval processes and music clearances inevitably come up, but there’s a larger pain point that each panel speaker has encountered too many times to count. Music supervisor, Brook Wentz echoes a passionate pea to the audience, specifically addressing the musical artists keen to explore the world of music licensing.

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“If you want us to use your music, the number one thing you need to have is contact information that you actually respond to,” says Wentz. “If you’re not reachable, you’re not going to get the gig.”

Music supervisors unarguably are at the forefront of music discovery, their roles so closely entwined with how quickly an emerging artist’s can enter the spotlight of recognition. Apart from the hurdles of negotiating with copyright holders for bigger named artists, there’s a resounding commitment for finding and helping artists catch a break. It’s something that aligns with Marmoset’s mission when helping clients license music for video (or creating original music) — it’s the consciousness effort to do right by artists first and foremost, before all else.

“One thing of the things I really like about indie artists is they get placement,” Rhodes says. “They understand that it is sort of the new A&R — sync is a way to get noticed. You can get discovered in the blink of an episode.”


Missed this special community education event? Head over to our Facebook page to watch the recorded steam (learn about a music supervisors tool belt and how they search for new music) — don’t forget to subscribe to our newsletters for future community events like this one and we’ll catch you next time!

Marmoset's Music Community Education Event One Week Away

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Design Week Portland is approaching quickly, which means we’re only a week away from opening our doors and kicking off the first Community Education Event of the year.

The event Sound Perspectives (learn more here), brings together a panel of industry experienced music supervisors and an audience full with musicians, filmmakers and creatives into one room. The discussion will revolve around the art of music placement in media, the panelists sharing their insider knowledge and experiences with those participating on this special evening.

Still need to RSVP? We got you covered. Head over to the Design Week Portland site to get moving — and don’t forget to peruse the rest of the week’s lineup.

Find Music for Videos Like a Pro

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From iconic film soundtracks — to the catchy song derailing your plans of skipping that ad on YouTube — it’s quintessential proof that music can either grab or lose someone’s attention quicker than you reaching the end of this sentence.

And just like your next big idea or project taking the right amount of forethought, so should your plan for finding the right music. Lucky for you, Marmoset’s roster of music has something for every project’s creative (and technical) demands. We’ve got three tips to keep in mind when when you are trying to find music for videos.


One

Steer clear of creative sabotage by budgeting for a project’s music needs way before beginning the song searching phase. Trying to find music for videos and then license a song you’ve fallen in love with while working with a few pennies remaining is heartbreaking for everyone involved.

While Marmoset’s music licensing team can work their magic on projects with the tightest of budgets, our aim is to ensure the artist — who’s ultimately providing the song of choice — walks away with a fair share for the song’s use.

Understanding the project’s terms (where it’s being shared/distributed and details like its timeline) is a good start toward finding and securing your dream music. Questions? Get in touch with our team and we’ll walk you through some options.

Two

While the Marmoset music catalog is curated by an expert team who understands music trends (especially when it comes to licensing), you might still need a little extra creative support when considering which music to license.

If you’re trying to find music for videos, utilizing the search tool and filters on the Marmoset search page is step in the right direction, but if you’re still feeling slightly overwhelmed, head over to the Marmoset mixtapes section.

Created by Marmoset’s music licensing coordinators, creatives and A&R team, these mixtapes are music collection gold. They’re compiled and curated with you in mind. From electro funk, vintage soul to songs with a lot of bass — you’ll find music collections for videos that we think will catch your attention too.

Three

Music that packs an emotional punch at all the right moments is half the battle when choosing music in your video. Sure, a song in its standalone state might sound amazing but it has to pair perfectly to picture once edited together with the actual video content. If you’re running into roadblocks after finding an almost perfect song but can’t get it to seamlessly fit with your video, you’re not out of luck; Marmoset offers a wide variety of customizable music that we can further tailor to your needs.

When searching for a song on the search page, select “customizable” in the filter settings and type in your song search keywords — all the shown results will be customizable friendly!

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Or if you’re contacting our creative licensing team to find music for videos, simply mention you’re interested in options that support customizability and we’ll get to work!

Learn more about customization here to get started.

Posted on April 3, 2019 and filed under Marmoset, Music, Music Licensing, Education.

Teaming up with Music Supervisor Experts for Design Week

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There's an art in getting people to pay attention. Whether this be getting audiences captivated by your film trailer or the brand campaign you’re crossing your fingers in hopes it’ll go viral.

For music supervisors, they understand there’s a strategic technique in getting content noticed — it’s part of their jobs when it comes to placing compelling music to picture. But every wonder how they approach searching for and licensing the music they find for film, TV and other media? There’s a story or two (or three) behind it.

Join us at Marmoset headquarters for this Design Week Portland special event where three industry Supervisors take us through the intricacies of placing music and how they connect & support their music community. 

Sound Perspectives: the Art of Music Placement takes place on Wednesday, April 10th at Marmoset Headquarters. 

Doors at 5:30pm

Event begins at 6:30pm

Space is limited — RSVP below before it's too late


About the panel

Morgan Rhodes is an LA-based music supervisor who is known for her work on projects such as Selma, Queen Sugar, and Dear White People which has allowed her to collaborate with filmmakers like Ava DuVernay, Oprah Winfrey and Justin Simien. Since the early days of cutting her teeth as an on-air personality at influential independent radio station KCRW, Morgan has spent the last several years as a music programmer with shows on Philadelphia’s WURD 900AM and LA’s KPFK. Her blend of avant-garde R&B, left-field soul, electropop, beats, dance and world music has won listeners both domestically and globally.

Brooke Wentz is CEO and co-founder of the new international music discovery site Seven Seas Music.  As the former Music Director of ESPN she founded the music supervision and licensing firm The Rights Workshop. She has authored numerous articles about music and published the book Hey, That’s My Music!: Music Supervision, Licensing and Content Acquisition and most recently Music Rights Unveiled. She is a Billboard Award winning producer for one of the best selling world music recordings, and a former NYC radio host. A graduate of Barnard College and Columbia Business School, Brooke resides in her native city, San Francisco.

Megan Barbour is a music supervisor at Buddha Jones in Hollywood CA. For the past four and a half years she has worked on numerous theatrical, broadcast, and video game trailer marketing campaigns for major studios including HBO, Netflix, Paramount, Amazon, Focus, and Warner Brothers. She is honored to be a part of the amazing Buddha Jones team.

Behind the Music Service: Customizing a Song from Start to Finish

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Ever find a song that sounds perfect on first listen — only to discover after pairing to picture how it's not quite hitting the cuts on cue? Don’t worry, that’s something the art of customization can help you fix.

Apart from partnering with and collaborating with our talented roster of artists, we also dabble in creating original music in-house for feature films, creative campaigns and more. Need sound design, customization or an original score? Nothing makes us happier than jumping into the studio to bring our clients’ creative vision to life (in an audible medium of course, wink).

While you may already be familiar with what scoring music entails, customization may not be as comprehensible to some. So we sat down to chat and learn more from our in-house Creative Music Editor & Composer, Greg Jong.

Find out what it takes to customize a song from start to finish — click play for a behind the service customization breakdown!

The Ultimate Music Glossary

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Navigating music licensing terms and definitions is a breeze when you have the ultimate music glossary on hand — so we created one just for you.


License

Licensing from the Marmoset catalog of music entails obtaining rights to use the song(s) for an agreed upon time period. Music licensing gives you the ability to use a song in almost any kind of creative project — like building out a stellar soundtrack for your feature film or creating a signature sound to your podcast’s intro.

Custom License

Marmoset can tailor a license to your project’s specifications — does your creative project have some tricky variables or broadcasting terms, or are you considering using a specific kind of vintage song but not seeing the “Buy Song” button? A custom license best ensures you’re covered, fill out our custom license form to get started.

End Client

The end client is the person or company the content is made for — if you’re a videographer hired to film and edit an ad campaign for Nike, the end client would be Nike. Swoosh!

Employee Count

This is is the number of employees who work for the project client’s company. For example, if you were creating a video for a large company like Amazon, the employee count is the number of employees employed by Amazon.

Internal Use

When music is licensed for content such as internal presentations, meetings, intranet or internal email blasts. If it's not being publicly shared or released, we consider this internal use.

Industrial Use

This refers to licensing music for media showcased in trade and sale shows, conventions, institutional meetings, retail dealers/in-store use, kiosks, PR use and B2B facing videos.

Instrumental

If a song is absent of lyrics (vocals), the song will be labeled as instrumental. Commonly, Marmoset has both instrumental and lyrical versions of a song — here’s an example of how an instrumental song is labeled on the search page.

Intellectual Property

Intellectual property covers intangible content and creations — it covers anything from trademarks to copyright. When you see intellectual property, this indicates that content belongs to that content creator. For example, a song, while not tangible, is still an artist’s intellectual property.

Lyrical

Lyrical indicates a song with lyrics (the inclusion of vocal melodies). Sometimes the lyrical versions of a song will contain lyrics. While browsing the roster, click the three vertical dots and select Lyrics to see more.

Monetization

Using on one’s content to generate revenue can be categorized as monetization. When it comes to music licensing, streaming sites or any platform that incorporates pre-roll ads is a monetary opportunity for the content creator.

Non-Permitted Content

This is content that goes beyond the limit of what the license terms cover. Using the previous example of a Personal - Single Use Podcast License — if the podcast is hosted on a commercial or website, this scenario would fall into non-permitted content. Not quite sure and need to double check? We can help.

Perpetual

A perpetual license means forever, ever. With perpetual licensing, you don’t have to worry about the hassles of renewing a license and its terms. An indefinite (perpetual) music license means you can keep your YouTube miniseries online without the song’s license expiring.

Performance Rights Organizations (PRO)

Performance Rights Organizations support artists and songwriters in getting paid for the usage of their work/music through royalties. While Marmoset focuses on helping our artist community get paid for their music, we are not a PRO but instead a sync licensing agency and original music production studio.

Permitted Content

When purchasing a license, you’ll want to review what exactly the license covers. For example, a Personal - Single Use Podcast License’s permitted content covers a single 12 month audio podcast series posted by a non-commercial place (i.e someone’s blog). Read up more on a license’s permitted content here.

PR Usage

Licensing music for promotional purposes or for your company’s PR campaign? This is right up your alley. We can help with licensing music specifically for PR use, just ask.

Renewal

In the case of licenses that are nearing their expiration date (non-perpetual licenses), once the license reaches its entire duration period you’ll have the option to either extend/renew said license.

Web (Paid)

When a song is being used in material where you’re generating revenue (think YouTube videos with sponsored or promotional ads, such as Hulu pre-roll or even social boosting) . Keep an eye out for this one especially if it falls within a license’s non-permitted content description.

Web (Unpaid)

Content with no ad dollars behind it or if being shared on a personal website. If your film was created outside an actual studio system and is being shared in a standard festival circuit, this is considered Unpaid Web. In the chance your film is picked up later for distribution, get in touch with us to revise your license conditions.